beach Tag | The Ring Finders

Wedding Ring Lost When Boat Capsized in Surf – Found!

from Paihia (New Zealand)
Contact: 021 401 626

Tim had lent his boat to his mates for a fishing trip out from Matauri Bay in Northland, New Zealand.

Tragically the boat went broadside and suffered a capsize as they were coming back in through the surf and was, shall we say, pummelled.
His gold wedding ring had been in a cupholder onboard and during the subsequent carnage in the waves, was lost.

Spin forward three months.  Tim made contact with me and asked what the chances were… Matauri Bay? Ocean beach, with such a big head start? I wasn’t too optimistic – Until I heard that the guys in the boat had taken note of the approximate location which at least gave me some sort of start point, and I knew there would be other items lost such as fishing gear which would assist me in pinpointing the exact location. The time elapsed was still a real concern though, as we had had a couple of good storms including a 1 in 500yr monster that wrought destruction across the region – with seas to match, and Matauri has no significant shallow hard bedding layer for the ring to settle on.
I let him know the odds were less than great, but would have a look to gauge whether it was worth actively searching or adding it to my ‘cold-case’ book.

I met Tim onsite the following day, and recapped the events of the day with him.

Without having one of the guys actually involved in the capsize there, it was Chinese Whispers over the phone….describing a featureless beach.
You have to start somewhere, and I had already started working a grid when he arrived, initially focussing on locating any concentration of targets.
It was not to be, and an endless stream of light targets of bottle caps, aluminium can tabs and corroded foil told me the sand was now deep over the site. Winding the machine to “redline” gave a few very rusty jigheads from a long way down but they looked too old – and I can guarantee Tims boat wasn’t the first, nor will it be the last to get trashed here.

Despite this false start, I was confident that I could find the debris field – Given time.
Over the course of many 2 and 3am starts, the big tides are never sympathetic to normal business hours, I started to pick up a few lead sinkers. Then a small tackle box and a large knife, both really deep down… Tim confirmed it was his knife and I could finally put a pin in the map! The only problem was the depth of sand and the now common metal detectors carried by holidaymakers at the local motorcamp just 50m away…

More visits and many night starts made for some looong days at my regular job, although bits of fishing kit started to consistently surface. I needed to clear all the jigs, lead, hooks etc in order to be able to hear the ring which would likely be under all this ‘noise’.

The other morning saw another rainy 2am start to catch the big tides. I settled in on the mark and quickly started digging fishing gear right on the low water line, a pair of pliers, knife, hooks – This was promising, very promising as it was obvious some sand had been lost.
I stayed in that same spot, digging target after target…after target. The pouch was starting to slide off my hips I had so much fishing kit in it. But no ring, and after 4 hours, the tide was chasing me out. I knew that if I walked away now I might lose the chance for another few months, or even years. What started out as wet sand was now wading depth with gumboots long since filled with water! I carried on digging oh, so many, many irritating small sinkers as the first light of dawn grew in the sky, and the cutoff to call it off and head off to work drew closer.

Yet another 1oz weight, check the hole, another, check the hole….a soft tone, down deep. There it was again. A half dozen quick deep scoops lifted it out of the hole and a flash of yellow in the scoop.

Tim was on holiday when I sent him the TXT and photo of the finds, asking why he uses solid gold fishing weights!
Two weeks later, this afternoon and after six months apart, the ring finally made its way home.

Three months head start, and another three to locate it – Ringfinding is definitely not for the impatient

Wedding Ring lost Sag Harbor Long Beach

from Suffolk County (New York, United States)
Contact: 1-516-526-4888

I received a text about a lost wedding ring from John. He took off his wedding ring when he when swing. He put it in the pocket in the chair.  When leaving he fold up the chair and the ring fell out.  He didn’t see where it landed.  He mark the spot and when he got home, he looked on the internet and Found the Ring finder web site. When I got his text I made arrangements to meet him at the beach the next day. He showed me the area that they were sitting and I started my search.  It didn’t take long as the spot was well marked.  He was happy to get his wedding ring back on his finger

Lost Engagement Ring Recovered Western Wisconsin in Apple River.

from Chisago City (Minnesota, United States)
Contact: 1-651-755-5905

I received a phone call from the mother of a friend of a gal that had lost her ring in the Apple River. For those that are unfamiliar with the Apple River, its about a 3.6-mile meandering river through the Wisconsin countryside. It has a couple of tubing companies that rent out tubes and will bring you back following your floating adventure.  The summer weekends are always busy with floaters from all around.  When floating it is always possible to drop something along the way.

Its not uncommon for people to get separated from some their possessions while enjoying a leisurely float down the river. If what you have lost floats you might be able to recover it quickly. Many people wear sandals and one gets knocked off, you can yell to a buddy to grab it or keep and eye on it and you will be able to recover it. Other times people may drop jewelry and not know where on the river it came off.  When I received a phone call saying that a person had dropped a ring, I thought it would be almost impossible to find without a known location. Even with a location it is exceedingly difficult to find something like a ring.  I mentioned to the mother that without a known location there is no way to find it.

Later the next night, I received another call, this time from Colton the fiancé of the Maria that had lost the ring. He said that he did have a known location and it happened to be where everyone gets out of the river following the ride. In the process of getting off the tube trying to get her feet under herself with the current and slippery submerged boulders under foot, she saw the ring slip off her finger and fall into the river.  She was also trying to stay upright while catching some tipping coolers and contents.   That night the group of friends ran to a local store and bought some snorkels and masks. They searched well into the night without finding the ring.  That’s when they looked up Ring Finders and came across several of the Ring Finders in the area.  They did call Ring Finder Darrin Gray. Darrin has been in Ring Finders the longest and has the recoveries to prove it.  This one was further away for Darrin and he suggested them to call me Paul Nolan being closer to the location of the missing ring.  I must give a shout out to the Minnesota Ring Finders and Darrin in particular; he works very well with the other Ring Finders in the area to help facilitate successful recoveries.

I arranged to meet Colton, Maria’s fiancé out on site to go over the particulars about the location for this recovery.  I started out getting acquainted with the flow of the river and trying to determine how far out she was into the river.  In the middle of the river the current is much swifter and moving quite a bit faster than near the edges. So the difference in 8-10 feet makes a huge difference on where the ring would end up on the bottom.

I jumped in with my Garrett AT Pro metal detector in hand and my pro point pin pointer.  Both are water resistant up to about 10 feet.  I start out generally making a primary search of that covers the area most likely to have the lost item.  In this case there were all kinds of obstacles that were going to make things much more challenging. The current, other tubers coming down tied together in a big flotillas. The river is about 3-4 feet deep with a lot of large boulders hidden underwater. These boulders are covered with a slippery surface so walking in the river becomes incredibly challenging. Searching between the scattered rocks and with small debris from years of floaters like, rivets from jeans, bathing suit zippers, pop tops, and parts to glasses scattered about. All these metallic objects set off a metal detector. So I worked the area from a semi standing position, slipping and falling many times trying to locate the ring. My chins and legs where getting banged up by slipping on rocks.  I think I spent 4-5 hours out on site the first day.  The only reason I left that night was it was getting dark and I was the only one left. I decided it was just too dangerous being alone. So I packed it up for the night.

I went back out again the next day changing my approach slightly and brought goggles and a handheld pin pointer but now I switched over to a secondary search. This is a more methodical search of a grid area. You start out with 4×4 blocks and you search it and move over and search the next 4×4 grid. One trick I did was to turn off all other metal from what I was looking for. So knowing I was looking for a Gold ring turned all the other metals off and was running a very tight band. I did this for about 3 hours when my gear started getting waterlogged.  A little water seeps in past some rubber o-rings and causes your equipment to become erratic. I also broke the plastic armrest on the detector fighting the current was putting so much pressure of the armrest. Adapting to the changing environment I spent the next 3 hours diving with goggles searching between rocks a looking in all the places that a ring might get lodged in. I had searched and area about 18’ x 40’ with some very strong current over half the area. Still nothing. I packed it in for the day and would go home and heal my legs and figure a way to modify the equipment to best work for the environment I was searching.  So I dried everything out and went to work on making a new much shorter handle. I also switched to a smaller coil “the end of the detector that picks up the metal signal” The smaller coil allows me to separate out multiple targets that are close together.  With the newly designed detector in hand I went back out for a third time. The detector with the shorter handle worked out OK. I could read the detector while operating it, it could be shortened a little more.

At this point you change again to searching the grid with all discrimination turned off and pick everything within reason. When you get a hit of a target you can read some information on the detector like type of metal, and how deep it is. If it is 4-5 inches down with a hard base you can rule those out. But if it is close to the surface you may have to dig those.  I again worked for about 4+ hours and came up with nothing. This last day of searching was on a Monday morning when fewer people would be out. When I did show up I was met in the parking lot by a guy that had been around while I was searching. Only this time he was is in a wet suit with mask and snorkel. He had been searching for the ring and was telling me that it was not there…

A lot of people were finding out about the lost ring from various sources. This is not a good thing.  You just never know if someone had come out and found the ring on you.  About this time all kinds of questions start entering your head, was the ring really lost in this area? Did someone else find it? How am I missing it? Is it an equipment setup issue.

I heard from the Darrin and we were consulting about maybe having him come out with dive gear and search using scuba. I had also heard that Maria and her father were going to go out and searching for it on Wednesday. So I planned on meeting up with them on site and give this another go with information from the person that lost the ring. When I arrived Maria and her father were on site in the river with wet suits metal detector and snorkel and masks.  I brought out a another ring and had Maria drop the ring in the same location and follow the ring. We did tie it off with some lite fishing line to help follow it to a resting place.

After locating the ring – Now this is where I had the search, so again I methodically started going over the area and picking everything that came up. The more targets that I removed the better it is.  After about an hour and half I was picking up targets that needed to have hand sized rocks moved away to get to those targets. It also had about 3 inches of sand on the bottom. With the water current moving past you could wave your hand over the sand and could get it to wash away.  After clearing an area I would move 3-4 feet and do it again. First wave the detector over the area and find locations of targets then go try and locate each target. The last target I waved my hand and thought I had seen a pop top pull tab circle. Whoa,  it was to shinny for that waved my hand past it again and there was a shinny ring laying on the bottom of the river. Was this a bling ring that had been tossed earlier by Maria and her dad? Was this the ring we were looking for? I popped up and asked her father, he was trying to look at it and tried to take it off my finger still in the river. I clinched down and said not until we get to shore. Maria had meet us at the shore and could not believe what she saw. It was her ring. The ring held a lot of sentimental value being it held her grandmothers diamond that could not be replaced.   She was in shock. What a happy reunion. She gave me a big hug. So thankful.  I didn’t have my camera with because I didn’t want it stolen while I was in the water. So I asked that they send me a couple of photos later, and I would let them enjoy the moment.  Maria was on the phone right away “ I cant believe he found it”  That was music to my ears as I turned and walked back to my car gear in hand. Some finds are very fast, and some take time. This one was one of the most challenging finds I have ever had.

Hampton Bays Tiana Beach Lost Diamond and Sapphire Ring

from Suffolk County (New York, United States)
Contact: 1-516-526-4888

I receive a text at 9 PM asking if I could help find a ring at the beach.  It was a Diamond, Sapphire and Platinum Ring.  I agreed to meet the next day at Tiana Beach In Hampton Bays.

When I got there they told me the area that they were sitting. I started a grid search, I always do a larger area so as not to miss the item I am searching for.

After a few passes I had a very strong signal. Using my beach scoop I found the ring.

I was told that he gave this ring to his wife on the birth of there baby. It had a lot of sentimental value to both of them.

 

Lost Engagement Ring Found Cape May NJ

from North Wildwood (New Jersey, United States)
Contact: 1-215-850-0188

Lost a ring? Don’t wait to call! 215-850-0188 Nicole lost her engagement ring in the sand in Cape May, New Jersey. The ring fell out of the cup holder in her chair. After she realized it was missing, she searched the area but could not find it. Then she reached out to fellow Ringfinder Jeff Laag who was unavailable at the moment, so he referred her to me. I searched a quick grid pattern and the ring was recovered.

Two rings lost in water at Fair Haven Beach – FOUND

from Syracuse (New York, United States)
Contact: 1-315-652-6996

A gentleman by the name of Brett called me and said that his wife had just lost her engagement and wedding rings in the water while swimming at Fair Haven Beach.  I jumped into my car and met them at the beach and this video shows the successful hunt for her rings.

   

Lost ring on Tybee Island Georgia found!

from Statesboro (Georgia, United States)
Contact: 1-706-830-5548

First find for TRF!

I woke up Saturday 8/9/20 to a frantic email from someone who’d lost a ring on Tybee Island, GA the night before. This lovely young couple had just gotten engaged and only 24 hours later the ring was lost. To make matters worse it was the last day of their stay there and they’d have to head back to Florida that afternoon. I set out from Statesboro that morning and met them on Tybee where they’d been camping out watching the spot where they’d lost the ring. After ten minutes of searching we were able to reunite her with the ring.

It was a highly trafficked area but luckily was very clean and so I didn’t have to deal with much trash.

All in all an awesome day and I was glad to be able to assist them in their moment of crisis.

“I can’t thank Todd enough for finding her engagement ring! After coming back to the beach to celebrate our sunset engagement, exactly 24 hours after I proposed to her, the ring got dropped. We were mortified after looking down and seeing nothing in the loose sand. We spent hours late at night combing through sand at the beach and were about ready to call it a complete loss; I expected nobody to be available on a Sunday morning, and we had nowhere to stay to wait any longer. Todd called us first thing in the morning after seeing our frantic email, and got from Statesboro to Tybee Island as fast as he could. After 10 minutes of searching, he found the ring buried under inches of sand! I’m eternally grateful for his help and expertise and would absolutely recommend giving him a call.”

 

 

Lost Ring Recovered Minnesota

from Chisago City (Minnesota, United States)
Contact: 1-651-755-5905

Family Vacation Blues – Not with the Ring Finders…

A family vacation in Northern Minnesota certainly could have been dampened when a wedding ring slipped off a finger into a lake.  But with the Help of Ring Finder Paul Nolan this Vacation was Quickly put back into Enjoyment mode once again.  Found in 19 Minutes.

 

Found Ring

Happy Again

Everyone was Happy once again.

Lost White Gold Mens Diamond Ring Danielson Provincial Park, Lake Diefenbaker

from Moose Jaw (Saskatchewan, Canada)
Contact: 1-306-630-3016

Tyler Called me about locating his Lost Wedding Ring in the Sand just off the Beach. Him and his family  was enjoying the day at the beach swimming he headed to the truck and was wiping the sand off his legs when his ring slipped off his hand. They spent the next couple hours searching for the Lost Ring. They head back to camper and was searching for a Metal Detector to Rent in Outlook, when they found my Name on the  internet. He called and we made plans to meet at the parking at 10AM the next day.

The next morning I made the 2 hour drive and at 10 we meet, he said I would need follow in truck to the secluded beach area down the road. He had place a stick at the location that the ring fell off. I  set up and started a grid of the area after a 20 minutes on the second good signal the ring was in the sand 2 inches. I pick the ring up and he was up the beach about 50 yards, as I walked toward the family he looked over and said you found the ring? I said I found a ring with 3 diamonds he said really mine has 3 diamonds  He  and his family was overjoyed at the discovery.

If you experience a loss call a professional to find it 1(306)630-3016

 

Old Silver Beach, Falmouth, Massachusetts Diamond Wedding Band Lost, Found and Returned

from Cape Cod (Massachusetts, United States)
Contact: 1-860-309-3307

Arriving at the resort earlier than check in time Sylvia and her party went to the sandy beach to wait for their room to be readied. The sun was warm and breeze delightful. A bit of sun tan lotion was in order. As with most beautiful rings with mounted stones one would take the ring off so to keep the cream from lodging itself under the stones. The the ring should be put back on. OOPS here is were Sylvia stood up before putting the ring back on. That was all it took for the ring to disappear into the fluffy sand.

No matter how hard the ring was looked for it had not been found. An attentive lifeguard stepped in to help save the ring by giving Sylvia information about TheRingFinders. A quick call to me and I was on my way. Parking and meeting up with Sylvia took a couple of phone calls before we met up. We were then on the way to the soft sandy area.

I began the search finding several Nip bottle caps, who said no alcohol on the beach? A couple of beer bottle caps and the growing crowd were beginning to wonder if I would ever find the ring. It all happened very fast as it took only about 5 minutes to capture the elusive wedding band in my scoop.
I walked over to Sylvia so she could take her ring from my scoop. This was my third successful wedding band return in one day.

How cheerful the crowd turned. Congratulations were offered and a jeweler chimed in with some useful information on sizing a ring and a reason not to have “bumps” put inside the ring. In one word: Comfort.