how to find a lost ring Tag | The Ring Finders

Lost Wedding Band, Dunedin, Fl. …Found!!!

  • from Dunedin (Florida, United States)

 

Steve Thomas

Dunedin Ring Finder

Lost a ring or other metal valuable in a grassy or sandy area? Jewelry slip off of you while working outside or swimming? Please call me ASAP at (843)995-4719. I offer a free metal detecting service, reward optional but appreciated upon recovery!

 

Mike was playing football with his son in a nearby park as it was getting dark. As he snapped the ball to his son for a punt, he felt his loose tungsten wedding band fly off of his finger into the grass. Mike and his son searched for a while but they were unable to locate the ring. As Mike is a neighbor of mine and his wife Julie reminded him of the service I provide, he drove his golf cart to my house and told me what happened. We returned to the park and searched for about an hour after dark with no luck. I returned early the next morning and gradually extended the search area but was again unable to locate the band. I had a beach hunt scheduled with a detecting buddy of mine Jim Facinelli later that morning so Jim and I returned to the park early in the afternoon to search for the ring again. After about 45 minutes, I found a ring in the grass but it was a stainless steel spinner ring rather than Mike’s tungsten band. Five minutes later and within 10 feet of the first ring I located the band as Jim was close to detecting it himself!

Mike, thank you for trusting me to find your wedding band and Jim, thank you for your assistance in the search!

 

Ring Lost Swimming at Whangarei – Found with Scuba

  • from Paihia (New Zealand)
Ella and her friends were swimming at the head of one of the Marsden Cove canals at One Tree Point, near Whangarei and as she moved out into the deeper dredged area, she felt her sentimental rose gold and diamond ring slip off her finger.
Long story short, five days later I found myself kitting up to dive the dock and hopefully locate her lost ring.
Although Ella wasn’t able to meet me on site, she did give me an excellent location of where, and how, it was lost.
Four minutes and twenty two seconds after reaching the bottom, I had the ring safely in my hand – I had spent more time putting the Scuba gear on than searching!
If you have lost a ring, or any item such as a bracelet or necklace, engaging an experienced Ring Finder as soon as possible gives you the absolute best chance of finding it.
This is especially so if the ring has been lost in the water, or in the sand.
I cover Whangarei, Tutukaka, Ngunguru, Russell, Paihia, Kerikeri, Coopers Beach, Taipa, Cable Bay and Kai Iwi and all areas in between.
I pride myself on an extremely high success rate with thirty six years experience and many hundreds of items found and returned in that time.

Tungsten wedding band found in yard in Reading, PA

  • from Reading (Pennsylvania, United States)

I received a text from Madi asking if I could be a hero and find her husbands wedding ring. He lost it on Christmas day while playing football with his brother at his parents house. Madi and Ryan live in Maryland and would not be able to meet me on the day of the search. They sent me great details on the area they think it came off. They were devastated after not finding it after several hours of searching. I arrived several days later because of my schedule and searched the area for about five minutes before getting a strong hit on my Garrett ATPro. I found the ring deep in the grass which was difficult to see because of the rings unique black and brown color.

I texted Madi and photo and told her i found it. She immediately called me and told me I was their hero. I went to the house to give the ring to Ryan’s mother who did not even realize I had searched for it. She was so excited I found it and would keep it safe until her son comes to visit her again.

Heirloom Signet Ring lost at Taupo Bay – Huge potential area, Found by Experienced Ring Finder

  • from Paihia (New Zealand)
Got a message from Krista
” Lost my ring at Taupo Bay today”.
After delving deeper, it transpired she might have lost her treasured heirloom rose gold ring at one of several locations: Washing the car, washing the dog, Potting/manuring some plants, swimming with the dog at one end of Taupo Bay, or when a boogie board was taken from her at the other end… HUGE potential area and with no start point. This is where experience takes precedence over ‘brute force’ (eg trying to cover every square centimeter). I met Krista  at her home, quickly eliminating the car/dog washing areas and the freshly manured garden plants as I waited for her to get ready to head down to the beach, although I already had a hunch where the lost ring would be found… I then followed her to the beach.
There were two locations of interest here, where she went into the water with her dog, and where a boogie board was taken off her. I chose to clear the latter first as it was at highest risk of being picked up by a casual holidaying metal detectorist as it was in the dry sand zone above the high tide mark and this time of year, coils are prevalent…
I cleared the highest probability area of the dry sand and with the tide about to turn shifted my focus to where she had taken the dog into the sea. I could return to complete the dry sand with a high intensity search if necessary.
At the swim spot at the other end of the bay, I asked Krista to retrace her movements and interactions from when she parked the truck. I mentally marked out the highest probability area on the sands as she retold her activities that afternoon and I settled in for a long search into the evening… I typically allow a minimum of four hours which, from experience, is sufficient to recover 90% of items. If the item is at a high risk of being lost to other detectorists, casual passers-by or a dynamic environment, eg surf, I often extend the hours to try and secure the lost item in the initial search phase.
After several circuits of the search pattern, I hit a nice solid tone at the waters edge – 3 inches under the surface lay her heirloom signet ring. It was outside the area she thought it would be [Trust No-one, Assume Nothing, Check everything] but the important thing was – It had been found.
I held it up and started to walk back towards her, a big grin on my face, a grin matched only by hers once she realised it was actually her lost ring and not someones elses.
All done, I packed up and headed home to get ready for my day job.

Gold signet ring lost at Cable Bay – Found in the Sea

  • from Paihia (New Zealand)
Second recovery for the year and hot on the heels of Andys ring recovery at Tauranga Bay (which you can read below)
Shortly after Christmas, Caitie was enjoying her holiday at Cable Bay wearing a special gold signet ring gifted to her for her 21st with the family crest that dates back a few hundred years engraved into it.
Tragically, she lost the ring in the waves, and gave it up as lost.
Almost a week later, she contacted me.
She had been buying a couple of “make myself feel better” rings at a local jeweller in Mangonui, who suggested Caitie get in touch to see if I could reunite her with the treasured ring.
The beach at Cable Bay is a steep gradient ocean beach. It’s very dynamic being composed predominantly of small broken shell fragments and anything dropped has potential to sink through the layers quickly with the wave action. After a week, having Caitie be able to meet me on site would be critical to push the odds into our favour.
Unfortunately she was slightly  delayed getting to the beach, so I got started with the information I had to hand.
I cleared the area as described by Caitie, then started expanding out – focussing on the low tide mark and wash as the tide was due to turn and start coming in.
Some 20 metres further along the beach, knee deep in the water, I got a faint tone. Could be one of the thousands of flecks of aluminium foil that inhabit that beach… or a deep ring.
With ring finding, you have to confirm every single target. It’s not uncommon to finish a search for a ring in the sea with 50+ can pull tabs, bottle caps and old copper coins in the pouch. (any detected rubbish is bagged to help clean up the environment – and avoid digging it next time)
It took several scoops to catch up with the ring in the fluid sand at a depth of nearly 40cm.
I secured her wayward lost gold ring and continued hunting casually for the next few minutes while I waited for Caitie to arrive.
The reaction when you return a presumed lost for ever ring is always worth far more than the melt value to me.
There were screams, clapping hands and jumping with joy from Caitie.
Priceless.

Gold Wedding Ring Lost in Sea at Coopers Beach, Doubtless Bay – Found

  • from Paihia (New Zealand)
Four days ago, while on holiday at Coopers Beach, Mary-Ellen lost her wedding ring of 32 years while messing around in the shallows. Her friend messaged me asking if a recovery was possible… Mary-Ellen and her husband were able to meet me on site which always greatly sways the odds in favour of a recovery.
The following morning, I drove up to meet them at Coopers Beach to try and find her lost ring.
As her husband marked out the boundaries of their swimming in the wet sand, I checked the dry sand where they had been sitting. Nothing found (other than the usual can pulltabs and bottle caps). So I moved down into the area where they were swimming and started to search the marked areas…as Mary-Ellen and her husband decided they might have gone a bit further down current – and extended the search area again.
I don’t mind people changing their minds mid search as it influences where I direct my efforts to maximise the chances of a successful recovery.
Ultimately, after covering 1,300 square metres to 90+% confidence, the tide chasing me out and the sun taking its toll, I had to call it a draw. A “draw” as the beach had won this time but I was going to be back.
That afternoon I was chasing a pair of hearing aids on a shelly trash-infested beach in Kerikeri – Unfortunately after six hours they still eluded me, possibly taken by tide or located elsewhere. Can’t always win.
The following day saw me driving a three-hour round trip down to Whangarei to recover Joshs lost wedding ring at Ngunguru (His story is below).
Yesterday was a rest day!
Despite four days having passed since she lost the ring, I was back chasing Mary-Ellens lost gold and diamond wedding ring again this morning… Confident it wasn’t likely to be in the original search area I followed the falling tide down and expanded the search area outwards, both along the beach and further seaward. Assume Nothing, Trust No-One, Check Everything.
About 10m outside the original search boundary, I got a faint but positive tone in the headphones.
.
They were in the process of packing up the tent to head home when Mary-Ellen got a text
“Hope you’re still in Coopers. I have something for you…”

Closure Search Leads to Success

  • from Cochrane (Alberta, Canada)

 

Sometimes I get called to search for an item that “might” have been lost somewhere. When I become that last resort, I conduct a closure search, hoping to find the item but knowing that there is a good chance it won’t be found. In cases like this, I usually ask for a flat rate fee.  Recently I was called up about a lost ring in a parking lot. She was pretty sure she had the ring before she arrived and after running a couple of errands at a couple of locations, she realized it was gone. There was no certainty but she asked me to check the locations where she had parked. I did without success. Later I met with her and searched her vehicle using my endoscope (tiny camera). She had searched the car already but I was able to check all the nooks and crannies. Still not found. When I left, I told her that her ring was not in the locations where I had searched. There were two possibilities. Someone may have picked it up (I left notes at the businesses where we searched) or she may have lost it elsewhere.  Two days later, I received a text with a picture of her ring. She had found it behind some bins in a closet.  Turns out that after my search had eliminated what she believed may have happened, she began to rethink the events surrounding the loss and was able to focus her own search elsewhere. This led to the eventual recovery of her ring.  Just another example of how a recovery specialist can help you.

If you are in the Calgary area, please contact me or if you are further abroad, visit www.theringfinders.com

Handcrafted Titanium Wedding Ring Lost at Ngunguru – Found!

  • from Paihia (New Zealand)

Josh contacted me explaining he had lost his handcrafted titanium wedding ring while swimming in the Ngunguru estuary the previous day.
It had been made by a friend for his wedding and whilst another could be made, it would never be the ‘same’ ring with the same memories.
A couple of local detectorists had been out to try their luck, however by this morning – the second day since loss, it had not yet been reported as found.

With a dawn start helping avoid most of the summer holiday traffic, I made the 130km trip in good time. Arriving about an hour before low water. This gave a small window where the current would allow a water search at slack tide, if needed.
While I waited for Josh to arrive, I thought I may as well get started, so grabbed the detector and headed down onto the mudflats.
My tracking experience enabled me to separate the straight line walkers tracks from the wandering footprints of someone looking for something from the previous day, although a couple of recently dug holes did have me concerned.
I had to assume the ring was still here until proven otherwise, so sorted out the areas of highest probability and started with the most likely area it could be located.
No sense in getting kitted up for a water search if I didn’t need to.

Ten minutes later, I lifted the ring out of the silt from in amongst some loose shells and walked back to the car to text Josh that I had “a present for him” when he got there.
I think there was some disbelief in his eyes that it actually was his ring when I handed it back – There wouldn’t be that many square titanium rings lying around 🙂
Hugs from his mum and handshakes from Josh and they headed off to enjoy the last day or so of their holiday up here.

CALL TO ACTION Need 1,000+ YouTube subs #SeattleRingHunter

  • from Mercer Island (Washington, United States)

Quick CALL TO ACTION please sub to my YouTube channel:

http://www.youtube.com/SeattleRingHunter

Need to pass 1,000+ subs have some amazing adventures planned for 2022 and want to promote TRF all along the way.

Together we can band together to make TheRingFinders a house hold name!

Thank you in advance for your continued support the more we get the word out the more we can help and server our community with specialized recovery services.

Happy Holidays,

SeattleRingHunter

How to find a lost diamond engagement ring in the snow

  • from Rockport (Maine, United States)

Visiting from Arizona to see her family for Christmas, the recently engaged Fiona, lost her diamond ring while sledding with her younger siblings at their home in Readfield, Maine. After renting a metal detector and spending several hours searching without luck, she found me through the Ring Finders website and reached out for my assistance. Due to a busy schedule as Christmas approaches the search had to take place after sunset, so with a Winter Solstice full moon and trusty L.L. Bean headlamp illuminating the area the ring was located buried in a couple inches of snow after about an hour of searching.