metal detector Tag | The Ring Finders

ME ENCONTRE!

from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
Contact: 98811429

FIND ME! | ME ENCONTRE!

WW2 Gold Signet Ring Rescued From The Drink, Port Beach, Perth, Western Australia.

from Perth (Australia)
Contact: 0469880955.

Eduardo had been cooling off in waist deep water at Port Beach recently when he felt his cherished signet ring slip from his finger. The ring with his initials on top had been made 75 years ago in a prison of war camp during World War 2. He had looked desperately around him in the water and then called out “I’ve lost my ring, I’ve lost my ring” to his wife Piera on the beach.

After calling me I arranged to meet Piera and Eduardo at the beach the next morning when the tide would be out making it wadeable where Eduardo had lost his ring. I took them down to the shoreline one at a time to show me where the loss had occured and noted that they both chose a place on the shore about six meters apart, so I halved this distance and put a peg in the beach to mark the centre and then paced out 10 meters either side of this and also placed a peg in the beach. I then set about working slowly in and out of the water with my metal detector until I had finished the 20 by 30 m grid and nothing, plenty of rubbish, a couple of coins, but no rings. I asked Eduardo if he thought I was going out far enough and he thought that I was. Next I said I was 99% sure I had not missed his ring so I asked if he felt that he could have been more to the north or south of the area I had searched. He felt more to the north was the go so I paced out another 10 m and placed a peg there. After finishing this and then another search extension grid and I’d still not found Eduardo’s ring they had said ok thanks so much for trying but it’s gone now and left the beach.

I was convinced the ring was there somewhere and detectable so with my usual never give in attitude I extended the search area yet another 10m, and still nothing. I thought ok if its not here it must be where I haven’t yet searched, so lets try 10 m to the south.

By this time the tide was a good way in again and the “Fremantle Doctor” was whipping up a few “white horses” and was clearly about to turn nasty for the afternoon so I resolved to come back the next day and resume the search on the southern end. In the morning I was about halfway through my first extension to the south when as I was approaching two women swimming in the water a great sounding signal penetrated my ears. As I raised what ever it was in my

scoop one of the woman had asked me “what are you looking for?” I looked in the bottom of the scoop and thought ‘no way’, there were Eduardo’s initials staring up at me! I turned towards the woman as I simultaniously lifted the ring from the scoop and said “Yes.. This! This is what I’ve been looking for for four and a half hours!

Piera was just amazed when I first sent a picture of the ring and then called to tell her the good news. She came straight back to the beach to collect it and was still a bit stunned but very thankful. I never did hear any of the stories this ring held but with 75 years of history and beginning it’s life in a prison of war camp I am so happy that it’s story can continue..

Love what I do.. Next??

Smart watch lost in Tawa, Wellington, New Zealand

from Wellington (New Zealand)
Contact: 022 361 4990

Branden had been cutting down trees and doing a bit of landscaping when he noticed his smart watch was missing.

When I arrived he showed me a large hole he had filled with compostable material and dirt and rocks.  Unfortunately it was up against a concrete wall that had metal reinforcing and so we had to dig it out by hand to avoid hitting the watch with any sharp tools.

It was amazing how hot the combustible material had got in just three days.  I scanned everything with a handheld pinpointer but when we got to the bottom of the hole there was no sign of the watch.

Next there was a raised garden that he had filled with pebbles.  I took a reading off an identical watch that belonged to his wife and used my CTX3030.

Still no target and it was looking grim but I carried on around the edge of the ground where I saw some old pebbles had been dumped.  Right next to a tree stump I got a dirty signal that was similar to the other watch.  Scraping away a layer of pebbles the plastic strap emerged and the watch was recovered.

When I checked the hole there was a 4” nail right underneath where the watch had been.

Branden was very grateful to get his watch back.

iPhone Found with Metal Detector, Paihia, Bay of Islands

from Paihia (New Zealand)
Contact: 021 401 626

Brand new iPhone rescued from the tide the other morning – And it still worked after spending a day underwater!

Owner was rapt to get it back, especially as it was their last day in the Bay of Islands before continuing their holiday through New Zealand.

Check out this expression. This is why I am a ringfinder and not a ring “collector”

Lost ring in Provo Canyon: Found

from Provo (Utah, United States)
Contact: 1-801-420-8485

Maddilyn got engaged one week ago, and she loved her beautiful white gold engagement ring. Yesterday, she went up Provo Canyon  to get some engagement photos behind Mt. Timpanogos. When they finished the photo shoot, she was horrified to find that her ring was gone! Some of the photos showed the ring, but some showed the ring was gone. They searched through the snow, then bought a cheap metal detector and searched some more, but they couldn’t find the lost ring. Last night, Maddilyn’s dad found me on TheRingFinders.com. This afternoon I met Maddilyn and her finance near the canyon. We drove up past Sundance ski resort where I started my search. It took 20 or 30 minutes, but I found the ring buried in the new snow! Hopefully, that one cold night the ring spent in the canyon will be the last night it ever spends away from her!

Lost Rings… in Corona, CA Found and Returned

from Corona (California, United States)
Contact: 1-951-415-6007

On Saturday, December 7, 2019, I received a text message from Joseph L. from Corona saying he was in need of my service. Joseph said that three rings were lost in the area of a vegetated slope next to the house across the street from his… (1) woman’s and (2) men’s rings. This occurred one week ago. Because it was supposed to start raining heavily anytime, I made arrangements to meet with him the next day. Sunday morning I contacted Joseph who told me that last week he and his wife had been arguing. In anger, his wife took off her ring, so he took his two rings off, grabbed hers and headed to the front door. Joseph went out onto the front porch and threw all three rings across the street in the direction of a large slope area. He said he heard one ring make a thud noise, so knew his heavy ring had hit the dirt on the slope. He said he hadn’t heard his wifes ring and the other ring he believes he heard hit the pavement or sidewalk. He directed me to the left side area of the slope, believing they were on that side.

I unloaded my gear from my car, which was parked at the other end of the slope, and noticed a small shiny oblong object in the street. As it didn’t appear to be a ring due to it’s shape (maybe a pop top), I disregarded it as Joseph felt sure they were at the other end of the slope and I would look closer at it later.

After obtaining permission to search the slope from the other property owner, I began searching. After about one hour, I wasn’t getting any signals other than bottlecaps (I learned kids used to hang out at night along there and drink). Joseph had come back outside and I told him I wasn’t having any luck, but wanted to look at that oblong object in the street by my car before he left. As we walked over to it I bent down and pulled it up from the asphalt. I immediately then saw small diamonds in a row and Joseph said that it was his wife’s ring. Unfortunately, it appeared it had been run over maybe several times.

Now that we were on the other end of the slope, I focused my search there. Rather quickly, I got a signal and located his Tungsten ring  (pictured). After a continued search of that area, I was unable to locate the third ring.

Although his other ring had not been located, Joseph was very happy to have the two back, and a little embarrased.  As he said, “Lessons learned by mistakes made”. I later learned he “upsized” a new ring for his wife and all were happy!

 

Engagement Ring Lost for 4 months! – Pensacola Beach – FOUND!!!

from Orange Beach (Alabama, United States)
Contact: 1-850-346-1736

I am so honored to be able to write up this story as one of the most amazing ring returns I have had with the Ringfinders. I warn you, it’s probably going to be a long one. 😃 2019 has been a great year. Early in the spring I had a call from a couple that had lost both the wife’s engagement ring and her wedding band out in a very large area of sand. My Father-in-Law, Tom Ledew had a freshwater machine but he didn’t have a saltwater machine. He had expressed some interest in the Ringfinders so I decided to ask him to join me and loan him one of my Saltwater machines. You can read the long story on another post but suffice it to say, Tom found one and I found the other and he now has a good Beach machine and is hooked. 😄. So that brings us to our current story… back in July, the day after the Blue Angels flew, I got a call from a very nice young man named Thomas. He had proposed to his beautiful bride, Dani only a few months earlier and she had not had the chance to have the engagement ring properly sized. They were in the water at Quietwater beach along with hundreds of other people and the ring just slipped off her finger sometime in the afternoon. I immediately came out to the beach and got all of the information that I could, right down to pictures from the boat, the tides and even the gps coordinates where the boat they were in was anchored during the air show. It was a huge area as far as water recoveries go but this is one of the nicest couples that I have met and I set out to do my best. I searched everywhere and dug up hundreds of pull tabs and I even found two other rings (one, I was able to find the owner in Tennessee 😃) but I could not find Thomas and Dani’s ring. I was bummed but I knew it was a large area so I asked if I could come out at sunrise the next morning. They said of course and I put in a few hours that morning and then put in a few more after work. All to no avail. I told Thomas that I could not find it and he was down but I told him I truly thought his ring was out there and with his permission I would like to keep looking for it when able and I would also like his permission to have my Father-in- Law help me with the search. Thomas said I could do whatever but felt the ring was lost forever and he said with all the people swimming that day he feared someone had seen it on the bottom and picked it up. I told him not to worry and that maybe one day I would come across it and call them. Fast forward 4 months and here we are in November. They were such a nice couple that I just haven’t been able to let their ring go. Anytime I am out that way, I always search for it a bit. I even came up with some down home engineering that anchors into the sand and lets me do overlapping circles to be absolutely sure I hadn’t missed a spot. Tom had been out to help me several times also and was becoming equally vested in finding this ring. Well within these 4 months, Tom Ledew was accepted into the Ringfinders over in Orange Beach, AL. (Congrats Tom! 🎉) and he had a recovery in the Gulf. I mentioned that Tom has a good beach machine but he remembered that first experience with my Excal which is simply the best machine there is for finding a ring out in the saltwater. Tom asked if he could borrow it and of course I said yes. He found the ring that day in AL so quickly and was so amazed that he had to have one for himself. Then it got really cold 🥶 and our plans to get in the water got put on pause. Through it all I kept going back to thinking about Thomas and Dani’s ring and I just knew I had covered the area where they thought it was. I also kept thinking that maybe Thomas was right and someone had picked it up but I just knew that gold sinks in the sand so quickly that it was almost impossible. I decided that the only possibility was it had to be a bit deeper where maybe the boat had swung around and Dani had to swim out a little to get on the ladder. Swimming + an oversized ring = an unhappy couple. So Tom and I made a plan to go back out and see if my theory was correct. Tom beat me to it and got his coil over it first but I am so glad that he did. This was his first major target recovered with the machine he tried for the first time earlier this year in the spring. It all comes full circle. 😃. The most fun I had was calling Thomas. Dani happened to be sitting right next to him when I started telling them who I was. Thomas had saved my number as “the Ring Guy” so he knew pretty quickly. They were shocked that after 4 months (twice as long as they had been engaged) this random guy would call and tell them that he had the ring that would forever remind them of the day that Thomas proposed. Congrats y’all, I hope this will remind you through the years as it will me to never give up!  😊

How to Find Lost Keys – Hire a Metal Detector.

from Paihia (New Zealand)
Contact: 021 401 626
A rather desperate Glenn phoned me at work yesterday afternoon – The jeans he was wearing when he went out to price a job had a previously undiscovered hole in the back pocket.
He parked his BMW, dropped the keys in his pocket and set to work.
His heart sank when he headed back to the car and realised his predicament.
There were a few catches to this tale; He needed the car to operate his business, The section was derelict and overgrown with waist high weeds, metallic scrap from renovations littered the site (along with domestic detritus from the previous habitation), said property was a solid 2 hour drive away – a smidge under 100miles(!) … and they were lost four weeks ago.
The one redeeming point was the fact that the keys were ‘safe’, albeit lost. They were tucked in the weeds somewhere and not going anywhere.
Mind you, neither was Glenn without them.
I managed to wrangle the next morning off work and headed south at 3am, I needed to be back at the desk at noon so made sure I was on site and ready to go at first light.
Using photos Glenn had taken of the property for his quote, I had several good known points and was able to determine his aged tracks between them.
The actual task of getting the coil close enough to the ground was impossible with the matted thatch of grass and thistles that had grown noticeably in the warm early summer weather.  I would be fibbing if I said I didn’t regret taking this one on when I saw the state of the undergrowth, especially with only a few precious hours available and a revisit out of the question.

First of all, I simply walked his exact path without the detector in order to define the known route and avoid confusion with other peoples tracks and the disturbance later when vegetation had been swept around by the coil.  The exact stops where he took the photos were dotted with fluorescent spray paint. These would become focus points where body position changed (turning, crouching etc). Likewise, places where he walked downhill were likely a higher probability as the material on the back pockets is more relaxed and mobile than when stretched going uphill.
I verified with Glenn by phone whether the keys were in left or right pocket. Since he walked clockwise around the property it weighted the search to that side of the tracks, slightly.
Out with the detector.  I started with a fast pass along the entire route. The endless hits on old buckles, tarpaulin grommets, roofing iron offcuts, toy cars and bits of galvanised tin was soul-destroying but each target had to be verified.
Second pass was a wider sweep, nudging slightly further into the weeds either side, although it was so dense the coil wasn’t making any headway.
I switched to a much smaller coil but while it was more efficient at getting into the grass, it became quickly apparent that with the lesser footprint I wouldn’t be able to clear the area before running out of time.
Final plan was to physically break down the thistles and flatten the grass as much as I could, then use my ‘dustbin lid’ big coil with its larger detection area and greater depth capabilites.
Three hours after starting, I got a reasonable high tone, out with the pinpointer and rummaged it through the long grass.
Parting the stalks showed a key, several keys!
Not sure who was more relieved, me or Glenn when he got the photo of the now found keys.

Lost Gold Earring in Northland Garden – Found!

from Paihia (New Zealand)
Contact: 021 401 626

At the start of the year, Renene was clearing undergrowth on their rural Northland property. Later on she realised that one of the many branches around the head had somehow spirited away her sentimental earring.
As so many people who lose rings or bracelets do, after a fruitless search for the lost earring they conceded defeat and accepted the loss… Until she started searching online for a metal detector to try and find her special missing gold.

We spent a few minutes on site going over her recollection of how she and her husband tried to find the lost earring, where they thought it would be, and the infamous spot ‘X’ was marked as a start point.

The vegetation was very tight, and a layer of past weedings and prunings covered most of any remaining exposed soil. I nearly took the headphones off to run on speaker the entanglements were so bad, however for such a small piece in a sea of background chatter I needed every subtle tone… I quickly cleared the ‘easy’ bits around the site, and headed out to change to a smaller coil to get in under all the shrubs when I got a new bit of intel – the path they usually took in and out.

Back onto the standard coil, and I started to grid the higher probability area of their entry/exit track.
To one side was a pile of branches which I worked hard up against, intending to leave it for a later, more detailed pass if it wasn’t found in the early searching. But since I was there, I’d clear them and close off this area now.
Heaved the pile up and swept the coil underneath, a faint whisper made my ears perk up. I put the detector down and shifted the pile.

A second pass and there was a distinct but subtle tone. Out with the pinpointer and just under the surface, on it’s edge, was the lost earring already making itself very comfortable for a long stay.

I made my way out and beckoned to Renene to come over to see her newly found earring lying where it had fallen some 10 months ago.

She was a bit pleased!

 

 

Lost New GoPro in Iowa Marsh

from Waverly (Iowa, United States)
Contact: 1-319-415-9540

The following story is from a local Nature Photographer who contacted me because he lost his GoPro

This picture says it all. I was paddling my kayak in about 30-degree temperatures when a spindly little branch knocked my 2-month old GoPro camera into moving water that was deep. In fact, the water was deeper than my chest-high waders were tall.

Finding this was more than just finding a nearly new GoPro camera. Along with the camera was a mount, a small tripod, and a high capacity memory card. Obviously the value of this was more than just replacing a camera.

I contacted Jason Scanlan at “The Ringfinders” to discuss running a metal detector in the cold, moving water. Within ten-minutes of searching there was a “beep” in the headphones and I knew where to scoop with a long-handled net. Another minute or so later and I had my GoPro camera and equipment back in my hands. I pressed the power button and was able to watch the recorded journey my camera took after being knocked off of my kayak.

Thank you Jason Scanlan/The Ringfinders!

Ladage Photography