Tom Caldie, Author at The Ring Finders

Man’s wedding band recovered

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

I received a call this morning from Brian D. who had just finished spreading a bale of straw on his lawn and could not find his wedding band.   He figured it must have slipped off during the yard work.  I was out with my wife at the Parallel 44 Winery picking up our membership selection, and told him I would search as soon as we returned.  About an hour later, I pulled up to Brian’s yard and began sweeping the straw.   As luck would have it, I found his ring in the very last square inch searched!  Brian was happy to put it back on his finger where it belongs.   And, because he knew I like wine, he gifted me a nice bottle of red wine from Tuscany, Italy, which he recently carried all the way back to the states!   Bonus!   

Triple Ring Set Recovered!

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

I forgot to post this last September, but it’s an aweseome recovery story!  I was called out by a married couple who needed some help searching a sand bar for her lost ring set.  It consisted of three beautiful 14k rings from their engagement, wedding, and anniversary with many sparkly diamonds, and it was her pride and joy, in addition to their four wonderful children.  She was throwing a football in the water with some friends and noticed it gone.  She never  thought it would be recovered until they googled Ringfinders.  She, her husband, and  I searched for the better part of a day with no luck.   Then, I went out on my own for a full day, again with no  luck.  I ventured out a third time with my two friends,  Jeff and Brian, thinking three experienced detectorists would have better results.  I found the signal right about where she had searched with me the first time, and quickly texted a pic to her husband.  He drove to pick it up and bought the three of us some hot hamburgers and cold beer.    It was great to see his smile!  He didn’t tell his wife it had been found, but just laid it on the kitchen counter and snapped her picture when she saw it.   Nice of him to share it!   The Ringfinders make a lot of couples very happy to recover their treasured memories.  It’s more than just finding rings.  

Soccer goalie’s wedding band recovered

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

Last week I received a call from a woman whose husband lost his ring on a soccer field in a park on the far west side of town.  I trundled out early in the morning to avoid the kids, and searched one goal for about 30 minutes, then switched to the other end.   In about 10 minutes, I found it just outside the chalk marks.  It must have slipped off of his finger just when he leapt out to block.     I snapped a photo of it, but forgot to ask his wife to pose when she drove by to recover it for her groom.  Oh well!   Will remember next time.   

Men’s wedding band found in Wrightstown, WI

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

Men’s art-carved wedding band found!

I received a call from Michelle a few weeks ago.  She and her husband, Chris, have only been married seven months and he already lost his ring!  The good news is he knew where it happened.  The bad news was it was 12 feet deep in the bottom of their friend’s swimming pond.   We coordinated a search for 5:30 last Wednesday, and my friend Brian P. arrived with two sets of diving gear.  I’m PADI Open Water certified, but don’t own any gear, so feel quite lucky that Brian is a much more experienced diver and he has a passion for recovering wedding rings.   We  searched for about 20 minutes and Brian found it with his Fisher 1280x, which can go down to 200 feet!  Soon, Michelle was smiling and driving the art-carved wedding band back to her groom.  It’s beautiful, with diamond inlays.  Nice!

Door county lost rings were quickly recovered

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

Tom Caldie was helping a friend with an art gallery near Fish Creek in Door County, Wisconsin when he received a call from a Milwaukee resident who had been visiting over the weekend.    She brought her two young sons swimming for their first time in a lake, and the experience was saddened by the loss of her 14k diamond engagement ring.   Even though the family purchased a metal detector, their inexperience and lack of a water scoop meant the ring was probably lost for good.

A Google search brought up Tom’s name, and Ringfinders came to the rescue.  By coincidence, Tom was only minutes away from the beach where it was lost, and quickly started a grid search as soon as the gallery was closed for the day. After a few hours of sweeping the area, and a phone call  to the owner to pin-point the probable location, this beautiful diamond ring and its memories were finally  recovered.    It was shipped overnight to Milwaukee and back on her finger in no time.

Not much later, on July 4th, Tom received a call from a man who had lost his palladium art carved wedding band near Sturgeon Bay.    After a joint effort involving scooping and moving several large rocks and gravel,  the ring was found.   Another happy ending!   I don’t have a pic of that one because of a phone glitch, but the memories and feelings that went with it will always be unforgettable. IMG_0763[1]IMG_0560[1]

Water recovery of stolen jewelry in Appleton, WI

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

On June 15th, Tom Caldie received a call from a homeowner in Appleton, Wisconsin, who had been burglarized.    The alleged thief was spotted running out the back door with a laundry bag over his shoulder.  He burst through a hedge, scurried down a retaining wall, and darted downhill through a neighbor’s heavily wooded lot to the Fox River.   911 was called and the police arrived shortly to find a man attempting escape by swimming across the river.   He refused to come to shore, and a police boat was launched to apprehend him.  No trace of the loot was evident because he had stashed it with the hope of recovering it later, and he would not reveal its location.

That night, two young men from the neighborhood found bracelets and necklaces in shallow water along the shore by shining lights into the river, but not much was recovered.   A few days later, the homeowner found Tom Caldie’s Ringfinder information through a Google search and called him.  She couldn’t believe such a service existed, especially in water.  Tom packed his wet suit, Garrett AT Pro, and Titanic water scoop and arrived at the site within an hour.    He followed the burglar’s track precisely, detecting under plants and brush, and found a few pieces of jewelry on the hillside leading down to the water.   Once in the river, he discovered a trail leading downstream of pearl necklaces and bracelets,  and some silver turquoise pieces.  They were mixed with weeds, between rocks, and in the muddy river bottom.  A   Then, a sudden tornado-like squall arrived with lightning, heavy rain, and high winds, and the search was cut short.

The next day, the river was only four inches higher because of the storm, and the water, which is normally a root beer color, was muddy, so Tom brought a compost rake to move debris.  Resuming his sweep, he followed the trail of dropped pieces to a loud signal submerged three feet under the surface and tangled under a large fallen willow tree.  Reaching in with the rake, he found laundry!   The third pair of shorts had two gold chains on it, so he knew he  was close.  Then, the rake pulled out a large purse with an assortment of necklaces and earrings in it, and some appeared to be gold.   A few more tries and the laundry bag was recovered as well, with watches, necklaces, and more clothes mixed in.  (Later, the police estimated the theft at $40,000.)IMG_0752[1]

After cleaning up more loose pieces off the river bottom, Tom brought the two bags to the homeowner, who was ecstatic to recover her platinum engagement band, wedding band, and ten-year anniversary rings!   She was quite happy to retrieve the other items as well, but those three rings brought tears and smiles.   It would have been a shame if they would have been lost forever on the muddy river bottom.IMG_0753[1]IMG_0751[1] IMG_0757[1]

Gold ring recovered in snow.

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734
Recovered from a foot of snow.

Recovered from a foot of snow.  Sometimes it pays to widen the search radius.  Gold can fly!

Found ring in 7 feet of water

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

IMG_8087IMG_8098Last week Monday I was called to Green Lake, Wisconsin’s deepest lake (239 feet) to find a lost ring.  Luckily, it was lost near a swim raft in 7 feet of water.   I arrived with SCUBA gear the following Sunday, and we found it after 2 hours of searching a very weedy bottom.  Luckily, we recovered a beautiful 14k wedding band for the smiling groom.   Smiles all around!

Lost Ring Green Bay

from Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States)
Contact: 1-920-288-2734

100_0923It’s the beginning of March, and soon the snowbanks will be melting.   Lost IPODs, rings, keys, and other valuables will soon be revealed.  My equipment can find rings in snow, but a good spring thaw expands search possibilities.

I found 15 lost rings last year, and 16 the year before.   With the ground thawing and lakes and rivers opening up, now is the time to contact me if you would like to schedule a search.

Don’t worry if it’s been lost a long time.  Once, I was called to find a depression-era gold class ring that was lost in the late 1940’s.  At the time, a little girl had borrowed the ring from her dad to play with it, and hung it on a pine tree branch so she could climb the tree.  It flipped off and was seemingly gone forever.   Many decades later, it took me a bit of luck and 20 minutes worth of searching with a Tesoro Silver Sabre to find it.  Smiles were on everyone’s faces as their precious artifact was returned.

The school insignia needed some restoration, but the main portion of the ring kept its beautiful shine, as gold always does.

So call me to discuss your loss, and perhaps schedule a search.   The least one can do is try.