Ring lost in snow, Onondaga Hill, Syracuse New York - FOUND

from Syracuse (New York, United States)
Contact: 1-315-652-6996

Sunday March 3, 2019 while my wife and myself are enjoying an afternoon with friends playing cards and a late lunch, my phone “dings”.  Upon checking my phone I see that I have gotten an e-mail that there is a ring lost in the snow up on Onondaga Hill, just southwest of Syracuse.  I make the return phone call to get the information, then excuse ourselves from the party and depart for home to collect my equipment.

 

Upon arriving at the client’s home I ask him if it’s OK to film the recovery and find out that because on the nature of his job he prefers that he is not filmed or identified. Therefore I will call him “Sam” and his wife “Sally”

 

It seems that two days earlier Sam and Sally had a little dispute and in the heat of the moment Sam took Sally’s wedding band, walked out in front of the garage and throws the wedding band over a 15’ tree in their front yard, across the road, and into his neighbor’s front yard. Now this is not the first time that a couple has had a dispute. Heck, my wife and I have had many disputes over our 57 years of marriage. But just as Sam let go of the ring all of his frustrations left him, so he tries to follow the ring as it flew through the air to see where it landed.  Now realize that the tree, although there are no leaves on it, is blocking his view and there is about 8 inches of snow on the ground up here on Onondaga Hill.

 

Sam, his frustrations now all gone, goes to a local sporting goods store, purchases a metal detector, and spent most of the next day, Saturday, looking for the ring in his neighbors yard with no luck.  So to paraphrase a movie saying, “Who you going to call”, The Ring Finders.

 

I arrive at Sam and Sally’s home and do the interview.  One of the first things that I do when I’m asked to find a ring is try to duplicate what happened, so I take out my test ring which has a long piece of red yarn on it, and have Sam duplicate the throw of his wife’s ring.  The test ring lands just across the road into the snow pile that the snowplows makes along the side of the road. Because the yarn on the test ring creates some drag, and the fact that Sam’s frustration cannot be duplicated, I know that Sally’s ring is located further, but most times in that direction. So I take out my metal detector, pin-pointer, grid marking cones, and start the search. I set up my grid starting where the test ring landed and expand the search as I work away from that spot.  About 1/2 hour later after getting “hits” that are just buried trash, aluminum foil etc., I’m well into the neighbor’s yard when I get that solid hit that sounds like it might be her ring.  I take out my pin-pointer, work it into the 8 inches of snow and there is her ring.  Success!, another ring is returned back to the finger where it belongs.  I looked from where the ring was found, back to where Sam was standing when he threw it, a 130’ throw. A very long throw with a very light, small ring.   Boy, Sam was really frustrated.

 

Sally’s ring now has some more history to it that she can tell her grandchildren.

 

Sam, box up that metal detector and return it to the store, then take your wife out to a very nice dinner and remember. A ring is a circle, there is no beginning, no ending, but when it is on a finger there is a high spot and a low spot.  All this happened at a low spot but things now are going to a higher spot in your marriage. And thank you again for the finders fee.

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